Activity and outcomes for aortic valve implantations performed in England and Wales since the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The first transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in England and Wales was performed in 2007. This study presents the subsequent national activity and outcomes for both TAVI and aortic valve replacement (AVR). METHODS: Data for all AVR and TAVI procedures between January 2006 and December 2012 in England and Wales were included. The number of procedures, patient characteristics, in-hospital and 30-day mortality, postoperative length of stay (PLOS) and survival were analysed separately for: isolated AVR; AVR + coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery; AVR + other surgery and TAVI. RESULTS: The number of TAVIs increased from 66 in 2007 (0.8% of all implants) to 1186 in 2012 (10.9% of all implants). AVR activity also increased over the study period. TAVI patients were older and had a higher mean logistic EuroSCORE than all AVR groups. The 30-day mortality rates were 2.1% for isolated AVR, 3.9% for AVR + CABG, 7.7% for AVR + other surgery and 6.2% for TAVI. In-hospital mortality has significantly improved for all groups. The 5-year survival rates were 82.6% for isolated AVR, 81.7% for AVR + CABG, 74.5% for AVR + other surgery and 46.1% for TAVI. The median PLOS after TAVI was similar to that of isolated AVR but shorter than that of the other AVR groups. CONCLUSIONS: Since the introduction of TAVI, there has been an increase in both TAVI and AVR activity. TAVIs now represent over 10% of all aortic valve implants. There are distinct differences between procedural groups with respect to patient risk factors. Outcomes for all procedural groups have improved, but long-term TAVI results are required before its role in the treatment of aortic stenosis can be fully defined.

Publication
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery
Date